Skip to content

My Professor Sent Me a Rude Email

According to reports, most students, especially at entry-level, do not understand how emails work, as they do not regularly use them. Often what could be an innocent but blunt message could be construed as rude. Unlike face-to-face exchanges, it cannot be easy to gauge your professor’s tone in an email. But again, a typical professor has so many things going on, and they may not have the perfect time to write niceties or pick on personalities. But what if, beyond every doubt, you feel the email is too informal or inappropriate? Then, of course, you may be compelled to do something about it.

How Well Do You Know the Professor?

Unless you are familiar with your teacher’s writing style, it’s not a given that they are rude. Checking if any previous emails are more friendly and professional can help you decide if your teacher’s tone is demeaning. Frankly, you also need to reevaluate the previous email you might

have sent, and it could be a precursor to the subsequent reply your teacher sends. So, before you call them out, look at these and many other aspects that could have led to any slurs or loosely informal language. In the real world, people do not necessarily have the time to fill emails with glitter but are rather candid.

Compare with Emails to Your Fellow Students

Before you make that ultimate assertion that your teacher is impolite, first check with the rest of the class. You can distinguish the type of language your teacher is using to address the rest of the class. The chances are that he communicates this way, and between him and your colleagues, everyone finds it normal. They can also tell you whether they feel offended in any way. But then again, if it is just you receiving such an email, then you have the right to complain.

Feel Free to Discuss the Email with Your Professor

Sometimes what you take at face value may not be true. It is the reason to have a word with your teacher to rule out bad intentions. As you speak with them, softly refer to the said email, and outline the words they might have used. Without being critical and accusatory, indicate how you feel belittled by the language. If your teacher does not come on the defensive, it could be that it is the way they are used to addressing their students and see no harm at all. Whatever the reason behind such an email, you will finally know and decide what to do. For example, if it’s intentional and the teacher is trying to pick on you, you must prevent it.

You May as Well Ignore the Rude Email

Except your professor keeps sending you rude emails, a one-time slip-up should not be cause for too much concern. While you may feel hurt, your academic journey comes front and center. You also do not want to initiate arguments with your teacher over a single, poorly worded email. They are human and might have just been in a bad mood while writing. Anything is possible, and sometimes ignoring would be the best option to keep the peace. Remember, the only way you can excel is to maintain good relations with your teacher, and it is on that basis that you let things go.

It Is Okay to Expect Professional Communication

The truth is that if you were to flip the coin, your teacher would have none of the unprofessional communication. A loosely written email should only happen if both of you have established non-judgmental friendly terms. But beyond this, you have all the right to expect a formal direct email from your teacher. Although it is also true that people have different ways of interpreting information, any derogatory words from your teacher should be considered as that. If you feel so slighted, then you should take the necessary actions so that it doesn’t recur.

Mostly, it is hard to gauge your professor’s tone through an email. Another assumption is that they would have no reason to single you out. In any case, they are dealing with many students at any given moment to go personal with you. But if you still are so sure of the disrespect, then use all legally binding means to stop it.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *