Why Your Baby Sleeps With Hands Behind His Head

It is always adorable to see your baby finally sleep. There is nothing special about the child sleeping, however. Looking at the child when they are sleeping is just inspiring to you. It gives you a feeling of patting yourself on the back and congratulating yourself for this accomplishment in your life.

However, this baby has to live, now that it came into this world full of life. As a loving mother and parent, you study and do a lot of research to ensure your baby’s safety. In the process, you come across information touching some aspects of the baby’s life, leaving you worried. These include how to put them to sleep, where you should let them sleep. Despite the bulk of work it entails, you want to follow everything to the teeth.

When you think you are as careful as you can be, you learn about babies’ sleeping positions. You also discover that many infant deaths have resulted from wrong sleeping positions in babies. That leaves you with a lot of work as a parent. Well, this article focuses on this challenging issue that you seem to have almost no control over. So if you have a problem with your baby’s sleeping position, this is the place to begin your search.

A Hard Nut to Crack

Everyone loves to be in control of any situation in life. So that whenever issues confront them, whether big or small, they are way ahead, sorting things out. However, sometimes things do not come to go our way. So even if the matter may have no apparent threat, we tend to stress over them.

One of these issues dealing with babies is when your baby sleeps with their hands behind their heads. Whether good or bad, it is quite challenging to regulate the position in which your baby should sleep. It is even more challenging if you do not share the same bed with the baby. Since word got out, if you share a bed with your baby, it may result in sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS).

So, how do you balance between sleeping and controlling your baby’s sleeping position? It is a hard nut to crack.

It Is Usual Among Babies

Nevertheless, first, you should know that this sleeping position is ubiquitous among babies. They are becoming familiar with the world they are born into by seeing, touching, and tasting with their little tongues.

When the baby is about six months old and above, they begin to form habitual sleeping positions. By this time, they are more in control of their movements, and they are also exercising their motor skills. During this time, they as well move a lot when they are asleep.

Is It Right or Wrong?

Knowing whether there is a problem with your baby sleeping with their heads on their hands is a good start. Because from here, you begin the process of getting informed on the well-being of your baby.

The sleeping position that the medical society recommends for babies is sleeping on their backs. However, it is an issue still subject to a lot of debate. But since there is a lot of research to back the theory, we support this theory. The position of the baby’s hand is not very important, therefore, rendering this sleeping position innocent and safe.

A Sign of Comfort

As you already know, children adapt and adjust to circumstances. Your baby enjoys those moments when you hold them and rock them. It is a time when the two of you are bonding, and you both relish the moment. When the baby is asleep, those moments play in their minds. They put their hands in the same position you place yours. You will notice that they put on a smile when they put their hands behind their heads.

If you try removing their hands from that position, they are likely to wake up with an expression of sadness. That is because you have interrupted a precious moment.

No Cause of Alarm

Your baby is enjoying some time independent of you. Even so, you are what they are dreaming about in their sleep. Let them enjoy that moment undisturbed. If you notice that they have breathing problems or are choking, you can address the issue.

If you feel that the sleeping position is causing your baby any problems, you should immediately contact your pediatrician.