14 Solutions If Your Toddler Hates Medicine

toddler crying about taking medicine

My toddler won’t take medicine!

The typical toddler hates to take medication. They might be sick with sneezing, coughing, fever, etc. However, it’s still like pulling teeth to get them to take it. Being a parent, you hate seeing your child sick. You want to do everything you know to do to help them feel better. The following are more ways that can help you get your toddler to take medication.

Try a smaller dose.

When having your toddler take medication, try giving them a smaller dose instead of a large amount at one time. For instance: if they are taking the liquid, try giving them a small amount, let them drink water in between, then give them another dose. If they have to take a tablet and are having trouble swallowing it down, try splitting it in half with a tablet cutter and let them take them separately.

Give your toddler a treat!

You might think it strange that you should bribe your toddler to take medication, but drastic times call for drastic measures. Your toddler might be more likely to take their medication if they know they can have a gift or candy in return. Who knows? Your toddler might get to a point where they don’t require a treat.

Offer your toddler a choice.

Sometimes, when a medicine is offered, several different flavors or colors are available. Help your toddler feel empowered by giving them a choice over what the medicine they take will look and taste like. They will feel better about medicine and won’t mind taking it.

Give your toddler’s medicine some flavor.

Some medicines only come in the horrible, tasting liquid, and there are no other alternatives available. Though it might seem bleak, there is still hope. Your pharmacist can mask the flavor of the liquid with flavoring offered by FLAVORx. They are FDA-approved and medically designed to cover the taste of bad-tasting medication.

Place the medicine in just the right spot.

At times, all it takes for your toddler to take their medication is to place it in just the right spot. The taste buds on their tongue are in the front and center. If you can get past those places, you’re almost home free. All you have to do is drop it near the back of their tongue, and they just have to swallow. The insides of their cheeks are also good spots to place the medicine.

Play hide and seek.

With your toddler’s physician’s permission, some medications can be hidden among food or drink. These can be mixed with ice cream, apple sauce, and many other things. You can even inject the medicine in a juice box with a small syringe you get from the pharmacist. This is a good way to ensure that your child will take their medication. However, if you use this method, make sure the child eats or drink all the food or drink.

Change up your delivery.

Usually, medication, especially liquid, comes with a small cup with measurements so that the correct dosage can be given. However, if this is not working for your toddler, try asking the pharmacist for a dosage spoon or small syringe dropper. Usually, just changing the method of delivery will do the trick. Also, if you let them hold the spoon or dip the syringe dropper in sugar, this can work.

Watch your face.

When giving medication to your toddler, try to watch the expression on your face. Be careful not to convey to your toddler that they are in for something bad by making a sad face. They might not respond to this and probably won’t take the medication. Instead, try to show a neutral face and keep this while your child is taking the medication.

Let them do something else.

Give your toddler their medication when they are occupied with something that they like to do or watch. This will distract them enough where they will take it quickly so they can get back to what they were doing. It will also take their minds off the stigma they’ve already developed in their mind that medicine is yucky.

Give them a popsicle.

Almost all toddlers love popsicles. It often works if you let your toddler lick one before and after the medication is given. Some medication is even offered in popsicle form. Most of the time, your toddler doesn’t even know they’re taking medication at all.

Some medicine can’t be taken orally.

Some toddlers are not able to take medication by mouth. They vomit, gag and are not able to get the medicine down. If you let their physician know this, they might be able to prescribe a suppository that can be easily inserted and dissolved. As a result, your toddler will still be able to get their medication.

Give them chewable medicine with similar-like candy.

If your toddler’s medicine is available in a chewable version, give it to them with other similar-like candy. They will feel like their medicine is also part of the “candy bunch.” For instance: you can give them a chewable allergy pill with Nerds candy. They might not look exactly alike, but they are similar. Your toddler won’t even notice.

Let them show something or someone else how to take medicine.

Sometimes it helps if your toddler feels like they are showing their brother, sister, or even the dog how to take medicine. They feel like they are doing a “great” service and helping out. It also helps you because you won’t have to struggle to get their medicine down.

Distraction always works.

Toddlers are too smart for their good sometimes. They know what you’re doing even when you think they don’t. So, sometimes, the best way to get their medicine down is to trick them. Blowing on their face is a good way to distracts them. It also makes them swallow and take medicine in their mouth. Just make sure you put the medicine in their mouth before you blow on their face.