Toddler Has Yellow Snot? When to Worry

Certain stuff just goes hand in hand. Peanut butter and jelly. Jack and Jill. Bacon and eggs. I mean, there are thousands on the list. One of the concerns of the all-time great your toddler. Snotty noses and toddlers.

The chances of your toddler not having a yellow booger infested snotty nose is slim to none. You would have a better chance of finding a unicorn than a toddler without nasal discharge.

The contents of a toddler’s nose go from one extreme to the other. One morning they wake up with barely a trace. The next morning snot is smeared all over their little face, and more is on the way.

It is safe to say a snotty-nosed toddler is one of life’s little gifts. A gift you can’t return and keeps on giving.

Oh, and it’s also color-coded. Decoding a toddler’s snot is usually left for mom. A seasoned mom can look into the tissue of a freshly blown toddler nose. Then tell you if there is a need to be concerned.

Yellow snot from a toddler’s nose. Today’s topic is going to be a bit on the gross side. Prepare accordingly and pack a few tissues.

Yellow Snot Means Antibiotics Are Needed…Right?

As a parent, I was always quick to assume when my daughter had yellow snot; it meant she had an infection. And we were about to take a trip to get some antibiotics. Isn’t the yellow snot an infection indicator?

In a word, no. The presence of the yellow snot doesn’t mean your toddler has an infection. Contrary to popular belief, yellow or green snot is not caused by bacteria.

When the child has a cold or other upper respiratory type illness, the white blood cell count rises. These white blood cells contain an enzyme that is a greenish-yellowish color and can turn the mucus(better word for snot, agreed?) yellow. A viral cold can turn mucus yellow. So yellow snot doesn’t necessarily come from bacteria, making antibiotics useless.

You can take the little one to the doctor, and they can rule on the viral or bacterial issue. And in most cases, antibiotics are not prescribed. The doctor will tell you to let it run its course. And come back to him if conditions get worse.

I have heard people say, “you can go to the doctor” or “tough it out.” Either way, you will be cured in seven to ten days!

Safety Net

Some parents insist on antibiotics. Their child has an infection, and they want antibiotics for them. If you are one of these types, parents and the child’s doctor won’t give antibiotics. Try a different approach.

First of all, these are merely suggestions and are meant for information only.

Tell the child’s doctor to write the prescription anyway. Tell him or her you will only get it filled if the child is not better or starts a high fever within a week.

You will feel better just knowing you have an ace up your sleeve should the child get worse. But, before you do get it filled, make the doctor aware of the child’s condition and see if he or she agrees. Be proactive about your child’s health.

Dust, Pollen, and Allergens

No matter how super-clean your home is, there is still the presence of dust. And according to the time of year, there is also going to be pollen. Add to it the presence of allergens.

Allergens are any substance which can be inhaled, causing an allergic reaction. The most common household allergens are dust, pollen, and pet dander. These items are constantly waging war against your child’s respiratory system.

You can dust your heart out, but there will always be these causes for concern. But, you can limit the number of allergens in your home.

Without breaking the bank for a new air filtration system, do yourself a bit of research. Find out which HEPA filter is the very best and buy it at your local DIY home improvement center. These filters can be installed immediately and begin to limit some causes of the toddler’s yellow mucus.

Also, deploy a heavy dose of disinfectants. As a parent, you were more than likely doing the disinfecting bit when the toddler was a newborn. Parents, in general, are usually proactive about the presence of germs around their children. Be one.

When To Worry

So it can be a normal condition for a toddler to have a booger impacted yellow snotty nose. While it’s not the cutest to look at, it is a normal part of toddler-hood.

But when the ‘good’ yellow snot turns into ‘bad’ yellow snot, you have a problem. How does it turn bad?

If your child has had the nasal condition with a persistent cough and a fever for five or more days consecutively, then the doctor needs a call from you. And take special note if the usual yellow snot turns into a yellow pus-like snot, then seek medical attention.

All of these ‘snot’ conditions are a normal part of a child’s early life. You can’t avoid it no matter how hard you try. Kids will have snotty noses. And parents will have readily needed tissues.

Allergies

Your child may be allergic to any number of items around your house. Children with allergies are another part of raising children’s job.

Some children are allergic to everything. And yet some, even siblings, are allergic to nothing. A child’s allergies are a contributing factor in all of those snotty noses.

Consult with the child’s doctor if you think he or she may be allergic. Children with allergies can lead a perfectly happy, healthy, normal life.

Conclusion

So you went unicorn hunting and found a yellow snotty-nosed kid! Well, for what it’s worth, so did I. My darling daughter went through the same stage, and she turned into an AT&T Executive. I wonder if AT&T knows about her ‘snotty’ past?

As always, give lots of love and affection.