7 Tips for Taking Baby to Fireworks

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Tips for Taking Baby to Fireworks

Having a newborn or infant makes a lot of regular, mundane activities a sudden challenge. You’ve likely been going to firework shows for years, but taking baby to fireworks is another ballgame entirely. Safety is fire and foremost the number one thing you want to focus on before taking your baby to a fireworks display. Not only can the loud noises and sights cause a baby to feel unnerved, but there are also safety concerns parents need to be aware of. Safety concerns will focus on a host of things, such as:

  • The loud noise of the fireworks
  • Potentially flammable materials around your baby
  • Excessive heat that may bother a child
  • The possibility of a mishap resulting in fire

If you’re certain that your baby is ready to weather a fireworks display, it time to go to work preparing for every potentially dangerous or uncomfortable firework encounter. Fireworks are often fascinating to children and adults alike, so it’s natural to want to show these small miracles to your child. However, taking baby to fireworks should always include a thoughtful plan.

1. Protect Your Baby’s Ears

Unlike ours, your baby’s ears are brand new and ready for action. Baby’s sense of hearing far surpasses our own, and sounds like fireworks may feel terrifying and/or even painful to their sensitive ears. We’ve been hearing these loud explosions for decades now, but they haven’t. Before you head to a fireworks show with your baby, make sure that you either take a pair of earmuffs for them or even invest in a pair of baby earplugs. The physical sound of the fireworks will often startle a child who hasn’t heard them before, so it’s essential that you grab something to protect your baby’s sensitive ears when taking baby to fireworks.

2. Avoid Sparklers

Small, personal fireworks may be fun and games for young children, but they’re not for babies, and in fact can even be dangerous when you take baby to fireworks. If your child is under five years old, the 982°C temperatures that sparklers reach are not for their little hands. While we know that sparklers are hot, to children they just look shiny and bright, and to a small baby, their first inclination might be to reach out and touch all that bright fun. Don’t let them near sparklers! They are far too young to resist reaching out to them. Many parents aren’t aware that sparklers aren’t safe for children younger than five, so being armed with this knowledge will help you protect your child.

3. Keep Baby at a Safe Distance

Fireworks displays that are far away may not necessarily require this kind of on-guard action, but if you’re going to a private fireworks ceremony where there will be fireworks in close proximity to the crowd, then it’s vital to keep your baby a safe distance away from them. Taking baby to fireworks at a friend’s backyard barbeque, for example, will require you to keep a close eye on your baby, where the fireworks are, and your baby sheltered from any type of fireworks. Bottle rockets and similar fireworks are often fired into the air, but sometimes they can misfire and go into a crowd. Stay far enough back to keep your baby safe when taking baby to fireworks.

4. Keep Water Nearby

Because of the heat and naturally explosive nature of fireworks, they’re one of mankind’s most fascinating, and hot, creations. There is always the possibility of a fire when there’s a firework display. Buckets of water, or any supply of water, should be kept nearby to make sure that if fireworks cause any type of fire, you can take immediate action and put out the fire. While larger fires should automatically result in a call to the fire department, smaller fires might be dashed by a handy supply of water. You might be able to keep a small 20-ounce water bottle, or several, in baby’s diaper bag.

5. Bundle up Baby

Mid-summer fireworks aren’t going to require this step, but if you’re going to a New Year’s Eve fireworks celebration, you’re facing some harsh winter temperatures, and this requires you to bundle up your precious baby and make sure that the elements don’t affect them during the celebration. Make sure they have more than a warm outfit and a coat. They’ll also need earmuffs, gloves, socks, and a scarf. Protect their face at all times from anything resembling the cold. By making sure that your baby is warm when taking baby to fireworks, you’re ensuring their safety in more ways than one.

6. Use Only Legal Fireworks

If you’re the one doing the fireworks display, or if you have a friend who invites you to bring your baby to their own show, make sure that the person has purchased legal fireworks clearly marked with the manufacturer’s logo and name. Legal fireworks are naturally safer than do it yourself fireworks or ones bought on a sort of black market for fireworks. You don’t want your baby attending any celebration that doesn’t include a healthy supply of only legal fireworks. Before taking baby to fireworks, always make sure that the fireworks being used are legal, and if you’re buying them for your own show, it’s vital to ensure they’re all legal.

7. Take Pictures

Taking baby to fireworks can be an exciting thing, especially if it’s your baby’s first time seeing fireworks. As long as you protect them from the noise and cold, your baby will likely find the fireworks just as exciting and fascinating as most adults do. They’re big, bright, beautiful, and a truly artistic spectacle to behold in the night sky. Taking baby to fireworks will likely be something you want to take pictures of. The first fireworks show won’t be the only one you want to take pictures of, but it’s likely to be the one that you remember the most.

As fireworks light up the night sky, and your baby naturally becomes curious, their eyes are likely to light up just like those fireworks. Some babies will laugh at the sight, others may just stare or express fascination. All of these reactions can be captured with a terrific camera, so make sure you have it handy for the occasion. That first expression after the first firework will likely be one that you go back to look at time and time again.

Conclusion

Like with anything else in your life, taking baby to fireworks should be all about your child and the bond you’ll share during the experience. Taking baby to fireworks is fun, challenging, and memorable. It’s something to talk to them about years after the event. Sometimes something quirky will happen, giving you a story to tell them later on. Whatever happens at the fireworks show, make sure that you have your camera handy, and be sure that every element of the event is safe and sound for your baby. Nothing is sadder than any event that goes wrong because you were ill-prepared.

Your baby has all its life ahead of it, but things like taking baby to fireworks will give you some of your best memories in the world, and some “firsts” only happen once, including that first firework in the night sky that your baby spies. With a lot of planning on your part, a baby that’s in a good mood (or not), you’ll have a terrific time sharing this wonderful experience with your child, and you’ll be able to discuss the memory for years to come. Make it a safe, good memory!