Can I Give My Baby Canned Vegetables?

Are canned vegetables one of the only options available to your baby right now?

No problem!

Canned vegetables are perfectly fine to serve to your baby. They tend to be less expensive, are shelf-stable, and very quick to prepare. Not only that, but canned vegetables pack just as many nutrients as fresh vegetables, if not slightly more.

Before serving canned vegetables to your baby, there are a few points to consider.

How can I prepare canned vegetables for my baby?

If choosing to use canned vegetables for your baby, there are a few ways to prepare them.

First, you can puree a few vegetable combinations like peas and carrots in a blender. Add a little bit of formula, water, or breast milk to help with the texture.

Second, you can just serve the vegetables as they are. However, smaller vegetables like peas and shucked corn are considered a choking hazard. Avoid these smaller vegetables and opt for long cut green beans, long cut corn, broccoli, and tomatoes.

Canned vegetables are a perfectly acceptable option to serve your baby when they are ready to start eating solid foods. Simply read the nutrition labels on the cans you are buying to be sure they are the best quality. Have some fun with it, and enjoy watching your child explore new tastes and textures.

What are the benefits of canned vegetables?

Since the baby should be eating a good amount of nutritious foods, canned vegetables can be a great option. Most vegetables are canned at their peak freshness. As a result, they have not had time for their nutrients to deteriorate. Also, the vegetables have not been subject to the elements during travel. This means they can be equally as flavorful as fresh vegetables.

The fact that canned vegetables are shelf-stable is another benefit as well. You can easily buy some cans to keep on hand and use as needed without worrying about it going bad. Canned vegetables are also a good idea if you have minimal refrigeration or regular power outages.

Canned vegetables can also take less prep work. This makes them a great option for the busy caregiver. You do not have to do any of the washing, chopping, or cooking as it is already done for you. Clean up is a breeze as well.

If your options are too used canned vegetables or no vegetables at all, definitely go with canned. Studies show that people who eat canned vegetables have better health than those who ate no vegetables at all.

Skip the salt in canned vegetables.

When buying canned vegetables, be sure to read the label for the salt content. Some vegetables are made with additional salt. Too much salt can lead to high blood pressure and other health concerns.

Choose the cans with no additional salt, or at least the smallest amount possible. Chances are you will add your salt to the food if preferred.

Avoid sugar in canned vegetables.

Another common ingredient in canned vegetables is sugar. Sugar can cause health issues like Type 2 Diabetes, heart disease, and obesity. Not only that, but added sugars should not be given to babies.

Opt for canned vegetables that are simply packaged in water or juice – never syrup.