My Baby Won’t Drink Milk

If your baby isn’t drinking enough milk, it can be upsetting. Just as upsetting as when your baby is still hungry after breastfeeding. You may even think you’ve done something wrong. Don’t worry. Babies not drinking enough milk is a common occurrence, and it can easily be fixed.

Babies refuse milk for many reasons. These reasons include the temperature of the milk, the taste of the milk, or the way the milk affects the child. Distractions can also prevent babies from drinking enough milk.

If you want to know why your child is rejecting milk, then keep reading. Solutions are provided so that you can nourish your child with ease.

What temperature should my baby’s milk be?

It’s often peddled to mother’s that their child’s milk should be warm or room temperature. The belief is that the warm milk best simulates breast milk. Many babies enjoy their milk being served this way, but there are probably just many babies who don’t.

If you have been warming up your baby’s milk, then try serving it to them colder. Likewise, if you haven’t been warming your child’s milk, then try it. They may enjoy the added sweetness of warmed milk.

How to warm your baby’s milk

When trying to warm your baby’s milk, it may be tempting to put it in the microwave. Don’t. If you want to warm your child’s milk, there are many simple ways you can do it safely.

The first method you can use to warm your baby’s milk is putting it in a warm water bath. To do this, all you need to do is follow three simple steps:

1. Prepare your child’s bottle. To prepare your child’s bottle, wash your hands. Next, you need to fill it to your desired amount. Now, put its cap on.
2. Create a water bath. To create the water bath that will warm the milk, grab a bowl that is large enough to fit the bottle and warm water. Next, you need to fill the bowl with warm water. Make sure the water isn’t too hot.
3. Place the bottle in the warm water. The final step you need to do to warm the bottle is place it in the warm water. Hold it there for a few minutes. After that time, the milk in the bottle should be warm enough for your baby to enjoy.

Another method you can use to warm your child’s milk is to hold their milk-filled bottle under running water. Make sure the water is warm. If the water is too cold, the milk’s temperature will not rise efficiently. If the water is too hot, your child’s milk will not be drinkable.

If you’ve tried adjusting the temperature of your child’s milk without success, then continue reading to find out what other solutions you can try.

My Baby Doesn’t Like Milk

If your child refuses to drink milk, it could just be that your baby doesn’t like milk. There can be many reasons why your baby doesn’t like milk, its taste, its texture, or maybe even its smell.

When some parents are faced with the dilemma of their child not liking milk, they feel the need to turn to juice. This desire is understandable. Your child needs calcium, and many juices are now being fortified with it. Even so, juice is not a good alternative for your child.

Can I give milk alternatives to my child?

There are many milk alternatives you can give your child. However, before you turn to them, give milk one last shot by trying a few suggestions that have successfully gotten other kids to enjoy milk.

Below are a few tricks that have successfully gotten kids to drink milk.

Miracle Tricks to Get Babies to Drink Milk

1. Carnation Breakfast Essentials. It’s a powdered drink mix that is packed with protein. All you need to do is mix in a small portion of the packet, and you’re good to go. Some mothers report that their children love the chocolate-flavored mix. Experiment to find the flavor that best for your child.
2. Flavored Milk. If your child doesn’t like the taste of regular milk, try mixing in a very small amount of chocolate, strawberry, or vanilla milk. The added flavor may be just what your child needs to enjoy a cup of milk.
3. Juice. Now, this may sound gross, but more than a few mothers have asserted that their children will only drink milk when juice is mixed in it. The flavor of juice your child will enjoy may vary, but orange juice seems to be a popular choice. Remember, use only a small amount of juice. Toddlers shouldn’t have more than 2 ounces of juice a day.

If none of the suggestions on the list above encourage your baby to drink enough milk, then your child’s disdain for milk may be because of biological reasons.

Lactose Intolerance and Dairy Allergies in Infants

Lactose intolerance and dairy allergies are fairly common. Though they typically affect adults, their symptoms can show as early as infancy. Your baby’s refusal to drink enough milk may be their way of telling you that it makes them feel sick.

The common signs your child may be having a bad reaction to milk are diarrhea, frequent crying after drink milk, noisy sounds in their stomachs, gas, vomiting, hives, rashes, coughing, or wheezing. You may have recognized these symptoms in your child and attributed them to something else. That is okay. There is so much to keep track of as a parent; it’s impossible to know it all. Give yourself a break.

My baby’s body doesn’t like milk

If your baby doesn’t like milk because of how it reacts with their body, then it is essential that you give them an alternative. The following is a list of good milk alternatives for babies. Please note that this list does include some dairy. The reason for this is because some babies, just like adults, may have a bad reaction to milk but react to other forms of dairy just fine. Experimentation may be the only way for you to know what sits well with your baby’s stomach. Work in conjunction with your child’s physician or healthcare provider.

Good Milk Alternatives

Dairy:

  • Yogurt. Yogurt is a good alternative for milk that you can give your child. If your baby has a dairy allergy or lactose intolerance, then it may be best not to use this alternative for your child. When selecting the best yogurt for your baby, make sure the yogurt you select has a good source of protein per serving. Also, make sure it isn’t full of sugar. Plain and vanilla yogurts tend to have less sugar, so they make a better alternative than fruit-flavored yogurts that typically have a lot of sugar.
  • Cheese. Babies that are at least 8 months old can have cheese. Cheese in small portions is actually healthy and can make for a good alternative to milk for your child.

Non-Dairy:

  • Soy Milk. Soy milk is a good cow’s milk alternative for babies who don’t like milk. Even though soy milk is made from soybeans, please keep in mind that children with milk allergies may also be allergic to soy even though it is free of lactose.
  • Almond Milk. Almond milk is another good milk alternative for babies who aren’t drinking enough milk. Like cow’s milk, almond milk comes in a range of flavors. Remember, almond milk is derived from nuts, so it is not safe for children with nut allergies. Almond milk is lactose and dairy free.
  • Hemp Milk. Hemp milk is a great alternative to cow’s milk. It is plant-based and derives from hemp seeds. Therefore, this milk is safe for children with dairy, soy, or nut allergies.
  • Rice Milk. Rice milk is another milk alternative that is safe for babies. It is a lactose-free milk alternative. Rice milk does not have calcium naturally, but there are versions of it available that is fortified with calcium.

Your baby may be distracted

If your baby is distracted while you are feeding them, then they may be deterred from drinking enough milk. Figuring out what is distracting your baby from drinking enough milk can be very difficult, especially if your child is easily distracted.

Conclusion

Try feeding your child in a room alone. Make sure the TV is off, and you put your phone is on vibrate or silent. Perhaps try playing some baby sleep music while you feed. The goal is to remove or prevent as many possible distractions as possible. If you need to feed your child publicly, try finding a less populated area, or try using your body or an object to block your child from distractions.