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Baby Swallowed a Penny? What to Do

baby crawling by coins

Once upon a time, a baby named Olivia was in a small house on a quiet street. She was a curious and adventurous little girl who loved to explore her surroundings. One day, while playing in the living room, she spotted a shiny penny on the floor.

Olivia had always been fascinated by shiny objects, and she couldn’t resist the temptation to pick up the penny and put it in her mouth. Before her parents could stop her, she swallowed the penny.

At first, Olivia didn’t seem affected by the penny, and her parents weren’t too worried. But as the day went on, Olivia started to experience abdominal pain and vomiting. Her parents knew something was wrong and took her to the hospital immediately.

The doctors examined Olivia and discovered that the penny had caused an intestinal blockage. They could remove the penny, and Olivia fully recovered. Still, her parents learned a valuable lesson about the dangers of small objects and the importance of keeping a close eye on their curious little girl. From then on, they kept all small objects out of reach, and Olivia never tried to swallow anything she shouldn’t again.

What do doctors say about babies and pennies?

Ingesting a penny can be dangerous for children because it can cause an intestinal blockage, which can be severe and potentially life-threatening. Therefore, seeking medical attention as soon as possible is essential if your child has ingested a penny or other foreign object.

In the meantime, please keep your child calm and monitor them closely for any signs of distress, such as vomiting, abdominal pain, or difficulty breathing. If your child is experiencing any of these symptoms, or if you are concerned about their well-being, call your local poison control center or go to the emergency room right away.

It’s also important to take steps to prevent your child from ingesting foreign objects in the future. Keep small objects out of reach!

What kind of germs are on a penny?

If your baby swallowed a penny, it came with germs.

Coins, including pennies, can potentially harbor germs, bacteria, and viruses. This is because coins can come into contact with many different surfaces and can be handled by multiple people, allowing germs to be transferred from one person to another.

Some studies have found that coins can harbor various bacteria, including species that can cause infections. For example, in one study, researchers found that copper coins (such as pennies) can harbor bacteria that can cause pneumonia and other respiratory infections. In another study, researchers found that coins can harbor the bacterium Escherichia coli (E. coli), which can cause diarrhea and other digestive problems.

Practicing good hygiene, such as washing your hands frequently, is essential to help reduce the risk of spreading germs. It’s also a good idea to regularly clean and disinfects frequently touched surfaces, including coins.

Why do babies like pennies?

Babies are naturally curious and may be drawn to shiny, colorful objects or make noise. Pennies can be particularly appealing to babies because they are small, shiny, and make a noise when they are dropped or jingled. Babies may also be attracted to pennies because they are easily accessible, as they are often found on the ground or in pockets.

It’s important to keep small objects, including pennies, out of reach of babies to prevent them from accidentally ingesting them. In addition, children under the age of 3 are at a higher risk of swallowing small objects because they are still developing the skills and judgment needed to determine what is safe to put in their mouths.

In addition to keeping small objects out of reach, it’s also essential to keep an eye on your child while playing to ensure they don’t put anything in their mouth that they shouldn’t.

How do I stop my baby from touching coins?

To help prevent your baby from touching coins, there are a few steps you can take:

  1. Keep coins out of reach: Put coins in a purse, wallet, or other secure location where your baby cannot access them.
  2. Supervise playtime: When your baby is playing, keep an eye on them to ensure they don’t pick up any coins or other small objects.
  3. Use a coin bank: Consider using a coin bank to store your coins. This can help keep coins out of reach and teach your child about saving money.
  4. Use a change purse: Consider using a change purse to store your coins. This can help keep coins organized and make it easier for you to access them when needed.
  5. Educate your child: As they age, teach them about the dangers of swallowing small objects, including coins. Explain that coins are not toys and should not be put in their mouth.

Remember, it’s essential to be vigilant about keeping small objects out of reach of children, especially babies and toddlers, to prevent accidental ingestion. In addition, if your child does swallow a foreign object, it’s essential to seek medical attention as soon as possible.

Swallowed coin treatment and removal process:

Sometimes, the coin may pass through the digestive system and be expelled into the stool. However, if the coin is stuck in the digestive tract or is causing symptoms, the healthcare provider may recommend one of the following treatments:

  1. Observation: The healthcare provider may recommend observation to see if the coin passes through the digestive system independently. The child may need to stay in the hospital for a short period for observation.
  2. X-ray: An x-ray can help the healthcare provider see where the coin is located in the digestive tract. If the coin is visible on the x-ray, the healthcare provider may be able to determine the best course of treatment.
  3. Endoscopy: An endoscopy is a procedure that allows the healthcare provider to see inside the digestive tract using a thin, flexible tube with a camera on end. The healthcare provider can use the endoscope to remove the coin or take other steps to treat the issue.
  4. Surgery: In some cases, surgery may be necessary to remove the coin if it is stuck in the digestive tract or if other treatments have not been successful.

It’s essential to follow the healthcare provider’s recommendations and seek medical attention if you suspect your child has swallowed a foreign object. Early treatment can help prevent complications and ensure the best possible outcome.

How long will it take for my baby to pass the coin?

It’s difficult to predict precisely how long it will take for a coin to pass through a child’s digestive system after it has been swallowed. The amount of time it takes can depend on several tours, including the size of the coin, the child’s age and size, and the location of the digestive tract.

In most cases, swallowed coins will pass through the digestive system within a few days. However, if the coin becomes stuck in the digestive tract or is causing symptoms, it may need to be removed sooner.

Does my baby think pennies taste good?

It’s unlikely that your baby thinks pennies taste good. Babies are curious and may put non-food items in their mouths to explore their environment. However, it’s important to remember that pennies and other small objects can be dangerous for babies to ingest because they can cause an intestinal blockage, which can be severe and potentially life-threatening.

When can I let my baby play with coins?

It’s important to keep small objects, including coins, out of reach of children under the age of 3. This includes putting coins in a purse, wallet, or other secure location where your child cannot access them. It’s also important to keep an eye on your child while playing to ensure they don’t put anything in their mouth that they shouldn’t.

As your child gets older and becomes more adept at determining what is safe to put in their mouth, you may be able to introduce coins as a teaching tool to help them understand the concept of money. However, it’s still important to supervise play and ensure that coins are not left within reach when they are not used.

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